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Cemeteries

Below is an illustrated index of the 9 Cemeteries profiled on Sacred Destinations so far. For photo credits, please see corresponding articles.



  • Remuh Synagogue and Cemetery
    Krakow, Poland
    The historic Remuh Synagogue is the only synagogue in Krakow to remain in active use. It dates from the 16th century and includes an original ark and a fine cemetery.
  • Adashino Nenbutsuji
    Kyoto, Japan
    Thousands of stone Buddha statues mourn the dead at this unusual hilltop temple. The main hall contains a medieval Amida Buddha.
  • Bunhill Fields
    London, England
    A Nonconformist (i.e. non-Anglican) cemetery, Bunhill Fields is the burial place of such notables as John Bunyan, Daniel Defoe, William Blake, and Susanna Wesley.
  • Saadian Tombs
    Marrakesh, Morocco
    This site next to the old kasbah was used for burials throughout the Saadian period (beginning 1557), then sealed up for centuries. It contains two mausoleums and nearly 200 tiled tombs of royals.
  • Tombs of the Kings
    Paphos, Cyprus
    The Tombs of the Kings are an early necropolis in Paphos dating from 300 BC. The burial niches were looted of artifacts long ago, but a powerful sense of stillness and mystery remains.
  • Père-Lachaise Cemetery
    Paris, France
    The most famous cemetery in France, this is the final resting place of Abelard and Héloïse, Chopin, Moliére, Oscar Wilde, Delacroix, Balzac, Jim Morrison and more.
  • St. Paul's Catacombs
    Rabat, Malta
    This fascinating labyrinth of 3rd-century subterranean tombs is the earliest archaeological evidence of Christianity in Malta.
  • St. Peter's Cemetery and Catacombs
    Salzburg, Austria
    Dating back to 1627, this old cemetery is a worthy attraction in itself and it's also where the Von Trapp family hid out in The Sound of Music. In the cliffs above are interesting monastic catacombs.
  • Jewish Cemetery
    Worms, Germany
    In the southwest corner of the walled city of Worms is the Heiliger Sand, the oldest Jewish cemetery in Europe. The green, peaceful grounds are home to hundreds of twisted and sunken tombstones, some more than 900 years old.