Russia

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Solovetsky Islands
Located on the frontiers of northern Russia, Solovki is home to a 15th-century walled monastery, a 20th-century Soviet prison camp, and mysterious ancient labyrinths.
Cathedral of Christ the Savior
The khram Khrista Spasitela may well be the largest Orthodox church in the world. The building is magnificent, but not as old as it looks: it was rebuilt in 2000 after the original was demolished by Stalin.
St. Isaac's Cathedral
This gigantic Neoclassical cathedral was built 1818-58 under the direction of Tsar Alexander I. In Soviet times, it was turned into a museum of atheism and a Foucault pendulum was installed in place of the dove.
Alexander Nevsky Monastery
Founded in 1710 by Peter the Great to house the relics of the military hero-saint Prince Alexander of Novgorod, this is one of only four Russian monasteries to be given the highest rank of lavra.
Choral Synagogue
Built in 1886, this Orthodox synagogue represents the turbulent status of Moscow's Jewish community over the years. The interior is a fine example of Moorish synagogue architecture.
Cathedral of the Annunciation
Blagoveschensky Sobor was built 1484-1489 by Russian architects and was the personal church of the royal family until the 20th century.
Ivolginksy Datsan
The small town of Ivolginsk in East Siberia is home to Russia's most important Buddhist monastery and a miracle - the body of the last Khambo Lama, who died in 1927, remains upright and undecayed today.
Holy Trinity Lavra
Founded in 1345 by St. Sergius and containing his relics, this is the most important monastery in Russia and the spiritual center of Russian Orthodox Christianity.