Paris, France

Paris
The famed flying buttresses of Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris. Photo © Sacred Destinations.

Paris is one of the most popular travel destinations in the world for good reason. Beautiful architecture, historical sites, top-notch museums, fabulous food, romantic strolls by the river... Paris has it all, including plenty for travelers interested in religious art and history. The capital city has played a key role in Roman, Christian and Jewish history and this heritage lives on in the cathedrals, monuments and artifacts these more devout times left behind. In addition, as a thriving urban center, Paris hosts a variety of newly-arrived religious communities including Muslims, Buddhists, Jehovah's Witnesses and Pentecostals. Follow a link below to explore the spiritual heritage of Paris.


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Sainte-Chapelle
Famed for its stained glass, this beautiful 13th-century Gothic chapel was built by King Louis IX as a royal chapel to house important relics of Christ.
St-Germain-Des-Prés
Built to house a relic of the True Cross brought from Spain in 542, this church was so powerful in the Middle Ages that it became a town within a town.
Notre Dame Cathedral
One of the most famous cathedrals in the world, this Gothic beauty is a must-see for its historical importance and magnificent artworks.
Paris Mosque
This pink marble mosque was built in 1922 to honor the North African countries that had helped France during WW I. It is decorated with mosaics, wood carvings and wrought iron brought from Morocco.
St-Sulpice
This huge - at one time the largest in Paris - Late Baroque church is located in the fashionable neighborhood of Saint-Sulpice.
St-Germain l'Auxerrois
When the Louvre was still a royal palace, this was its church. It accordingly drew an assortment of royalty, courtesans, men of art and law, and local artisans.
Sacré-Coeur
This 19th-century basilica and landmark is built over the place to which St. Denis is said to have carried his own head after his martyrdom.
St-Clotilde
The most fashionable church in 19th-century Paris, this basilica dedicated to a saintly French queen is best known for its imposing twin spires.